Bishop's Waltham man labels supermarket "monstrosity" for defying planning permission

The canopy of the Priory Service Station on Winchester Road was built 500mm taller than original plans allowed, and overshadows the garden of Mr Dennis’ family home

The canopy of the Priory Service Station on Winchester Road was built 500mm taller than original plans allowed, and overshadows the garden of Mr Dennis’ family home

First published in Winchester
Last updated
Romsey Advertiser: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A SUPERMARKET has been accused of building a petrol station 50cm too high, making it visible from neighbouring gardens in Bishop’s Waltham.

Resident John Dennis has branded the petrol station’s canopy a “monstrosity,” and now planning chiefs could tell Sainsbury’s to demolish the canopy to comply with planning rules.

The canopy at the Priory Service Station, in Winchester Road, is taller than original plans allowed, and overshadows the garden of Mr Dennis’s family home where he lives with wife Heidi, and their children Daisy, seven, and Aaron, nine. It can even be seen from inside the Victoria Road property.

Mr Dennis says the lighting fills his house with ambient light — until 11pm when the station closes.

Mr Dennis, who originally backed the plans for a new filling station, said he felt disappointed and let down, claiming he has not had a response to his complaints after numerous letters and phone calls.

“It’s appalling the way that they have handled it. It’s appalling customer service and is insulting,” he said.

“I supported (the station) because it is solar-powered, and because it was going to be a million per cent nicer than what was already there.”

It wasn’t until work had started that Mr Dennis noticed the canopy was significantly more visible than plans proposed, and he reported it. He says it has ruined his enjoyment of his home.

Winchester City Council has neither confirmed nor denied if a planning enforcement notice will be issued.

Martin O’Neill, a spokesman for the city council, said: “When a development does not meet the agreed terms of a planning permission there is a range of options from negotiation and agreement between those objecting to the development and the developer, appropriate mitigation, a retrospective revised planning application for the differences in the development, or — ultimately through planning enforcement — the developer being required to adapt, change or remove the aspects of the development that do not meet the permission.”

The supermarket has applied for retrospective planning permission.

A Sainsbury’s spokesman said: “We engaged with local residents and the council as part of the planning process for our new petrol station, and are in an ongoing dialogue with Mr Dennis to address his concerns.

“We have suggested a number of practical proposals and are committed to bringing the matter to a satisfactory conclusion for all parties.”

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