AS THE rollout of the Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine begins in the UK today, many people will be wondering when they will be invited to have their jab.

Brian Pinker, 82, became the first person in the world to receive the vaccine since it was approved for use in the UK.

Just over half a million doses of the newly approved vaccine will be available from today, with the Government aiming to administer two million per week.

Now, an online calculator can tell people when they are likely to be called in to have their coronavirus vaccine.

The Omni Calculator tells users how many people in the UK are likely to be in front of them in the queue for the jab, including when they could expect to receive their vaccine.

So how does it work?

Vaccine queue calculator questions

The Vaccine Queue Calculator asks a series of questions, such as your age, if you are a frontline worker and if you live in a care home or work in one.

It adds if you are pregnant (or plan to be in the next three months) it is not recommended to currently have the vaccine, but states this advice could change when further trial data is available.

On their website, it says the results are worked out based on the Government's nine-point priority list and the likely rate of vaccination.

In simple mode, the tool assumes one million people will be vaccinated a week, however this can be changed to two million in advanced mode.

The website highlights it has based its results on the assumption 70 per cent of the UK's population will accept the jab, using "the figure last year for people aged 64 and over who were offered the annual flu vaccine".

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What happens after you answer the questions?

The calculator gives you a time range of when you might expect to be called in for the vaccine.

This is usually quite a rough estimate - perhaps of around a month - or, as our example shows below, a period of three months or more.

The Government is giving priority to the over 80s, care home workers and NHS staff.

But for the rest of us, there hasn't been much information.

So thousands of people are searching for the calculator online, even if it only offers an approximate idea of vaccine timings.

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Not an official calculator

According to the Evening Standard, the calculator is independent and not connected to the NHS or the vaccine rollout programme.

Omni Calculator claims to have "the most unique, crazy, knock-your-socks-off calculators on the web".

The public can use it to work out itching questions from how many years of your life you can save by picking a bike over a car to their cooking calculators.

Omni vaccine calculator link

To find out when you're likely to receive the jab according to the calculator, visit the Omni website.

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